Martha Nussbaum: Philosophy and Emotions

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Some excerpts from 25 Jul 16 issue of The New Yorker about Martha Nussbaum, philosopher. Interesting only to me, probably.

  • “To be a good human being,” she has said, “is to have a kind of openness to the world, the ability to trust uncertain things beyond your own control that can lead you to be shattered.”
  • She argued that tragedy occurs because people are living well: they have formed passionate commitments that leave them exposed.
  • Nussbaum was wary of the violence that accompanies anger’s expression, but MacKinnon said she convinced Nussbaum that anger can be a “sign that self-respect has not been crushed, that humanity burns even where it is supposed to be extinguished.”…In a 2003 essay, she describes herself as “angry more or less all of the time.”

And from Nussbaum’s Wikipedia page:

Nussbaum’s other major area of philosophical work is the emotions. She has defended a neo-Stoic account of emotions that holds that they are appraisals that ascribe to things and persons, outside the agent’s own control, great significance for the person’s own flourishing.

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About Eric Chandler

Husband. Father. Pilot. Cross Country Skier. Writer. Author of Outside Duluth and Down In It.
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